SAG Awards 2022: Ted Lasso, Squid Game, Coda win big

The SAG Awards are considered one of the most reliable predictors of the Academy Awards — actors make up the largest percentage of the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences.

The cast of Ted Lasso, the leads of Squid Game and Troy Kotsur of CODA have won at the 28th Screen Actors Guild Awards. The ceremony, held at Barker Hangar in Santa Monica, California, and broadcast on both TNT and TBS, saw history made in a number of categories. Kotsur, best supporting actor in a film, is the first deaf actor to ever win an individual SAG award. And for the first time, actors in a non-English language series — the Korean phenomenon Squid Game — took home awards. Lee Jung-jae won best male actor in a drama series and Jung Ho-yeon won best female actor in a drama series.
Kotsur, a veteran 53-year-old actor who gave a breakthrough performance in Sian Heder’s film, had already been the first deaf actor nominated individually for a SAG award. When his name was read, Kotsur plunged his head into his hands. On stage, he praised CODA as the rare film to portray a deaf family authentically. But he concluded comically.
“Thank you for my wife for reminding me to check my fly before walking the red carpet,” said Kotsur.
The Squid Game wins for Lee and Jung came over big names like Succession stars Brian Cox and Jeremy Strong, and Reese Witherspoon and Jennifer Aniston of The Morning Show.
“I have sat many a times watching you on the big screen dreaming of one day becoming an actor,” Jung told the crowd, fighting back tears.
The SAG Awards are considered one of the most reliable predictors of the Academy Awards — actors make up the largest percentage of the Academy of Motion Pictures Arts and Sciences. Kotsur’s win suggested he may have emerged as the Oscar favorite over the competition, notably Kodi Smit-McPhee of The Power of the Dog.
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Meanwhile, Ariana DeBose of West Side Story confirmed her frontrunner status with a win Sunday for best supporting performance by a female actor.
“It’s taken me a long time to feel comfortable calling myself an actor,” said DeBose. “My roots come from the dance world and the Broadway stage, and the Anita that we see on screen took every bit of me but she took 10 years to make.”